Advice On Schools

December 27, 2007

I
agree with the sisters who said you have to take each school
individually, whether they are public, private, religious or
whatever… I think it boils down to who is teaching and what they are
teaching…

 

I
took my children out of public school for a while when they were still
of elementary school age. I tried homeschooling with the help of a
couple of friends who would come see us and teach what they knew. In
those days though, there was no support for homeschooling. At least now
they have charter schools and the schools and teachers support parents
and children to work together on the children’s education. Back then I
was mostly on my own and it soon became overwhelming; I just couldn’t
keep it up even with those occasional classes offered by friends.

 

So
then I tried a couple of alternative; then called "free schools." They
were usually inspired by A.S. Neill’s book "Summerhill." Neill was a
groundbreaker in the field of children’s education, and one of the
first to publish rants on the deficiencies of the system and to offer
an alternative.

 

However,
these schools were on the frontier in those days, and again there was
too little support. As a result there was not enough equipment, space
or supplies available… and not enough staff either.Kids tended to
fall into chaotic behaviour and not much actual learning or education
took place. After several attempts I had to give up and put my children
back into the system.

 

My
son never graduated highschool. By that time we were a performing
troupe and they got a lot of culture and training from doing that work
with me. They were exposed to myths, literature, poetry, music, dance,
and goddess lore, among other subjects. But our lifestyle made us
appear "different" to their peers in the redneck schools they had to go
to in theSanta Cruz mountains, and they were both tormented and
scapegoated.

They both dropped out early. My son was more fortunate
than my daughter… he found support and alternative ways to get
educated. By then he was full on dedicated to his dancing, and his
first opportunity was to study mime in Paris with Marcel Marceau. He is
now world famous and extroardinarily knowledgeable; in his own field as
well as many others he has studied on his own.

 

My
daughter did not get the support my son got when she was breaking away
from home. But later she went back and completed her highschool
education…and then college as well, where she graduated with honors.

 

Both
my children are so intelligent and well rounded people… it seems the
loss of those early school years did not represent much of a loss after
all…

 

I
think schooling should have more apprenticeship style approaches, where
young people can get hands on experience working side by side with
people in the community who are doing work that interests them. More
field trips… more exchange students between communities and
countries…

 

One
time when we were performing at the Renaissance Faires, the school they
were in at the time supported us to do projects for credit while we
were gone. My children kept wonderful journals and had to make entries
in them at least once a day, discussing what they were learning and
experiencing. We also brought lots of study materials with us that the
teachers gave us. That worked out great! :0)

 

I
think we do have to be careful about our kids getting brainwashed. This
is a real danger, not only in schools of all stripes… it’s
everywhere; in the tv set, in the advertising, coming from peers,
engraved in the stratosphere, in the culture. So no matter where you
send them or don’t send them for their education, I think you need to
be vigilant and work to offset the lies and oppressive programming. I
used to have "life classes" with my kids spontaneously, whenever I
spotted a twisted idea or thoughtform about to be swallowed and
creating an imprint that could influence their lives forever. I would
sit them on the floor and walk around them in a circle, ranting away.
LOL!

 

My
mom did the same for me and my sisters though perhaps not quite as
dramatically. <g> She was my first teacher for sure. She said
"Don’t ever get married." "Don’t ever get a job." "Don’t ever go to
college." and – "Stay unemployed as long as you can; it’s the only way
to get anything done." And "in an enlightened society you would be paid
handsomely for what you do." :0)

 

Rantishly,
Shekhinah

From Moonspell Library

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